Category: BJ Ryan

On Richard Griffin’s Blue Jays

Meet Doc Halladay\’s heir apparent (July 11, 2010)

Kyle Drabek is a reasonably likely piece of the puzzle, but the article goes too far. It is a flight of logic to presume that because Kyle Drabek is a highly-touted prospect, the son of a Cy Young winner, and was involved in the Halladay trade that he is now Doc’s heir apparent. As far as I`m concerned, he cannot be spoken of in this way, until he shows signs of life at the MLB level in the way Marcum, Romero, and Cecil have. Does anyone remember the full page spread the National Post did on our dear Mar-Leaf Jeremy Williams a couple of years ago? Anyone remember him? I think the Toronto Star would do itself, Drabek, and Jays fans, a favour to knock down a few notches the expectations of untested prospects.

Jays rally late to take manager off the hook (May 5, 2010)

Griffin reveals an anti-Cito bias. What an unbalanced take on another great Jays comeback victory. Instead of focusing on perceived managerial mistakes, why not reflect on how strong the starting pitching has been, or the Jays resolve in battling back to the final out? Of course, it is okay to criticize any manager, but the focus of a Jays comeback victory in the 9th need not be on perceived errors made by Cito, passed off as fact.

High time for Cito to get over his mistrust of pitchers (May 29, 2009)

One begins to wonder whether Richard Griffin and BJ Ryan are related. He former “manages” to gloss over just how poorly the latter started this season and finished last season: an 85 m.p.h. hour fast ball and circus-like unpredictability, even when he does get out of an inning. Ryan has deserved little trust under Cito. In hindsight, and that’s all it is, Brian Wolfe was not the right choice to try and save the game Thursday. But hey, he was reliable last season and had been on the mark until his meltdown. And by the way, Wolfe doesn’t have any career saves because he has almost never had save opportunities unlike Ryan, who has blown so many in recent memory. Let’s call up Jeremy Accardo again from Las Vegas.

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Wells lost at sea, Janssen eaten by fish

 

TORONTO — The wayward Vernon Wells could not rescue a shaky Blue Jays pitching staff during a 6-5 loss to the visiting Florida Marlins Saturday before 20,634 baseball fans at Rogers Centre.

Coming off a year-long rehabilitation from a torn labrum in his right shoulder, Jay’s starter Casey Janssen struggled through 3 2-3 innings giving up five runs on eight hits.

Jeremy Hermida homered in the third, and Jays-killer Cody Ross followed up his grand slam Friday by nailing a Janssen breaking ball in the fourth to make it 5-0.

“I just think, first of all, it looked like he got his cutter up a lot today,” said Cito Gaston of Janssen. “He had a little trouble getting his breaking ball over and, the fastball counts, if he threw his breaking ball, it was down and it was a ball and he had to come back and throw his fastball.”

In his fifth start of the season, the 27-year-old former reliever fell to 2-3, ballooning his ERA to an unsightly 6.23. David Purcey, also 27, carried a 7.01 ERA through five starts in April before losing his job.

Marlins rookie-starter Sean West survived 5 2-3 innings, improving to 2-2 on the season.

An RBI double by Hanley Ramirez scored Chris Coghlan in the first, and a double-play ball hit by Coghlan in the sixth plated Cody Ross from third base and accounted for the Marlin’s last run.

With the Jays down 6-2 in the sixth, Lyle Overbay, named American League player of the week June 7, jolted a two-run shot to put Jays within two.

Marco Scutaro led off the seventh with a walk, advancing to second base on a walk to Aaron Hill. Vernon Wells gifted third baseman Wes Helms a light grounder which he launched into centre field, while trying to throw out Hill at second before Scutaro wheeled home to make the score 6-5.

Wells blew a golden opportunity when he struck out in the bottom of the ninth with Rod Barajas standing on second base, ending the game and a miserable 0-for-5 day at the plate.

Cursed by at least one baseball god, Wells finished the game on a 0-for-14 skid. Through June 13, he is batting .241 overall and .149 with runners in scoring position. Gaston moved him up to the number three spot Friday after 62 consecutive games batting clean-up.

One gets the feeling that the streaky Wells, a two-time all-star, is capable of captaining a sinking HMCS Blue Jay, or sailing it safely into October.


The loss gives the Jays an unseemly 0-5 record in interleague play and 4-16 lifetime record against Florida.

Alex Rios, 4-for-4 with a two-run dinger in the fourth, seems to have reversed his fortunes since Gaston moved him down from number three to six in the batting order. Rios stole second base in the eighth, but catcher John Baker threw him out when he tried to steal third.

“You’d like to see him safe, but we’re not swinging the bats that well,” said Gaston. “So, we’ve got to try to make something happen. He stole second base and gave us a chance to drive him in.”

In middle-relief, Sean Camp lasted three innings allowing one run. BJ Ryan lowered his mountainous ERA, from 6.91 to a slightly less ridiculous 6.46 in one scoreless inning of work. Jason Frasor (4-0), one of the few bright lights out of the bullpen, and closer Scott Downs held down the fort in the final two frames to give the Jays a chance.